Get the Assistance You Need for Your I-751 Removal of Conditional Residency Case

When a spouse seeking permanent residency has been married to their sponsoring spouse (the U.S. citizen or green card holder) for less than 2 years when their green card is approved, the green card will provide "conditional" permanent resident status. This means that the green card is good for only two years.

Before this two-year green card expires, the conditional permanent resident must petition to "remove the conditions" and obtain a ten-year green card to continue living lawfully in the United States for the long run. This means filing a Form I-751 and submitting new evidence of an authentic marriage.

If you're a conditional permanent resident approaching your two-year anniversary as a green card holder, you'll need to be extra careful when completing your Form I-751 and preparing your supporting documents. This means leaving no unanswered questions on the form, making sure that both you and your sponsoring spouse sign the form (if filing jointly), and including every relevant piece of evidence.

When do you submit your 751 petition?

If you are filing this petition with your spouse together, then you need to submit it within 90 days before the two years green card expires. For example, if your green card expires on July 1, 2020, you can file on April 1, 2020.

However, if you are filing this petition individually, then you can file anytime.

But if you're a conditional permanent resident approaching your 2-year anniversary as a green card holder, you'll need to be extra careful when completing your Form, I-751 and preparing your supporting documents. This means leaving no unanswered questions on the form, making sure that both you and your sponsoring spouse sign the form (if filing jointly), and including every relevant piece of evidence.

Will there be an interview for this process?

You will most likely undergo an in-person interview with USCIS. USCIS officers may consider waiving this interview requirement only if there is already enough evidence to decide without an interview. As of December 2018, this is extremely rare. It is important to note that all applicants for a marriage-based green card must attend their 485 interview to prove the authenticity of their marriage. If you entered with a spousal immigrant visa (CR1) and only interviewed by a U.S. Consulate or Embassy overseas, then you may need to have a 751 interview with a local USCIS Field Office.

What Can We Do for You?

Based out of Schaumburg, IL, with additional offices in Chicago, IL, and Madison, WI, our firm is committed to serving the immigration needs of clients throughout the world. Our clients include people coming to the United States from India, Mexico, China, Serbia, the Philippines, United Kingdom, Nigeria, Brazil, and around the world.

Francis Law Center is committed to practicing immigration law; in fact, it is the only kind of law we practice. Attorney Jae Francis Lee brings experience as a professional working as a Professor of U.S. History at the University of Wisconsin and holds a Ph.D. from New York University. He understands the importance of in-depth research and meticulous documentation required for a successful marriage-based green card case. Your mind will rest easier knowing that we are working on your behalf for your successful spousal green card case.

Schedule an Initial Consultation:

Call us at 877-312-0956. You can also reach us online. We look forward to hearing from you.